POLÍTICAS Y DISPOSICIONES PARA LA ESTRATEGIA DIGITAL NACIONAL Y MAAGTICSI

Manual

http://www.normateca.gob.mx/NF_Secciones_Otras.php?Subtema=61

Política tic/maacticsi

Matriz de Asignación de Responsabilidades

Asignación de responsabilidades en los proyectos

La gestión de recursos humanos en los proyectos consiste en realizar todos los procesos necesarios para asegurar que se hayan identificado y asignado los mejores recursos humanos disponibles en la organización para llevar a cabo todos los objetivos del proyecto dentro de las respectivas restricciones de tiempo, alcance y costo. Sin una clara asignación de responsabilidades que permita un monitoreo efectivo del desempeño, pueden fallar los mecanismos de responsabilidad y rendición de cuentas dentro del proyecto. Para evitar esto, una de las herramientas que puede utilizar el líder en la gestión de recursos humanos es la matriz de asignación de responsabilidades (MAR).

Continue reading “Matriz de Asignación de Responsabilidades”

Eclipse in ubuntu

Eclipse is a multi-language Integrated development environment (IDE) comprising a base workspace and an extensible plug-in system for customizing the environment. It is written mostly in Java. It can be used to develop applications in Java and, by means of various plug-ins, other programming languages including Ada, C, C++, COBOL, Fortran, Haskell, JavaScript, Perl, PHP, […]

Eclipse is a multi-language Integrated development environment (IDE) comprising a base workspace and an extensible plug-in system for customizing the environment. It is written mostly in Java. It can be used to develop applications in Java and, by means of various plug-ins, other programming languages including Ada, C, C++, COBOL, Fortran, Haskell, JavaScript, Perl, PHP, Python, R, Ruby (including Ruby on Rails framework), Scala, Clojure, Groovy, Scheme, and Erlang. It can also be used to develop packages for the software Mathematica. Development environments include the Eclipse Java development tools (JDT) for Java and Scala, Eclipse CDT for C/C++ and Eclipse PDT for PHP, among others.

The initial codebase originated from IBM VisualAge.[2] The Eclipse software development kit (SDK), which includes the Java development tools, is meant for Java developers. Users can extend its abilities by installing plug-ins written for the Eclipse Platform, such as development toolkits for other programming languages, and can write and contribute their own plug-in modules.

Released under the terms of the Eclipse Public License, Eclipse SDK is free and open source software (although it is incompatible with the GNU General Public License[3]). It was one of the first IDEs to run under GNU Classpath and it runs without problems under IcedTea.

Ubuntu, here are some steps that help you getting Eclipse working on Ubuntu

1. Install Sun Java JDK

#sudo apt-get install sun-java6-jdk

2.  Download Eclipse
You can go to official site http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/ and choose your edition,

Save to your Desktop

3. Extract Eclipse
Open Terminal, and execute:

#cd ~/Desktop
#tar xzf eclipse-php-galileo-linux-gtk.tar.gz (replace your downloaded file name here)
#sudo mv eclipse /opt/eclipse
#sudo mv eclipse-galileo.png /opt/eclipse
#cd /opt
#sudo chown -R root:root eclipse
#sudo chmod -R 755 eclipse
#cd /opt/eclipse
#sudo chmod +x eclipse

4. Create a .desktop file to eclipse:

gedit ~/.local/share/applications/opt_eclipse.desktop

Then, paste this inside (dont forget to edit Exec and Icon values):

[Desktop Entry]
Type=Application
Name=Eclipse
Comment=Eclipse Integrated Development Environment
Icon=** something like /opt/eclipse/icon.xpm **
Exec= ** something like /opt/eclipse/eclipse **
Terminal=false
Categories=Development;IDE;Java;
StartupWMClass=Eclipse

After that, open that folder with nautilus:

nautilus ~/.local/share/applications

If you want to use this launcher outside dash/launcher (ex: as a desktop launcher) you need to add execution permission by right clicking the file and choosing Properties -> Permissions -> Allow execution, or, via the command-line:

chmod +x ~/.local/share/applications/opt_eclipse.desktop

Finally drop opt_eclipse.desktop to launcher.


Uploaded on Oct 29, 2011

A short walkthrought of the Eclipse Software Development Kit.

Plugins used in this video:
1. PHPEclipse (http://www.phpeclipse.com/)
2. Aptana Studio (http://www.aptana.com/)
3. Subversive (http://www.eclipse.org/subversive/)

Uploaded on Nov 24, 2011

Tutorial showing installation, requirements and configuration of Eclipse itself and the PHPEclipse plug-in.

Link mentioned in the video regarding line endings: http://www.evolt.org/node/60247 (scroll to Linefeeds part)

Published on Mar 16, 2013

A short tutorial outlining the features of PHPEclipse.

 

Published on Mar 22, 2013

A quick walkthrough on all the goodies Aptana plugin for Eclipse provides when editing HTML, CSS and JavaScript code.

Link about Java 7 and FTP problems on Windows 7+ mentioned in the video: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/69…

 

Published on Apr 3, 2013

Quick tips and tricks to help you effectively tackle the most redundant activities during development – including extra safeguard tip using the Local History.

 

Published on May 10, 2013

Presentation of 2 ways I know of to work with FTP and synchronization in Eclipse:

1. utilizing Aptana’s remote synchronization (http://www.aptana.com)
2. using the not-yet-so-deprecated FTP and WebDav Eclipse plugin (http://jcraft.com, http://eclipse.jcraft.com)

Published on May 26, 2013

Quick introduction to remote versioning systems with a peek into Eclipse’s SVN interface and TortoiseSVN program.

Link to SourceForge: https://sourceforge.net/
Link to GitHub: https://github.com/
Link to the Timeline: Inventions project: https://sourceforge.net/projects/time…

perl

Perl is a family of high-level, general-purpose, interpreted, dynamic programming languages. The languages in this family include Perl 5 and Perl 6.[4] Though Perl is not officially an acronym,[5] there are various backronyms in use, such as: Practical Extraction and Reporting Language.[6] Perl was originally developed by Larry Wall in 1987 as a general-purpose Unix […]

Perl is a family of high-level, general-purpose, interpreted, dynamic programming languages. The languages in this family include Perl 5 and Perl 6.[4]

Though Perl is not officially an acronym,[5] there are various backronyms in use, such as: Practical Extraction and Reporting Language.[6] Perl was originally developed by Larry Wall in 1987 as a general-purpose Unix scripting language to make report processing easier.[7] Since then, it has undergone many changes and revisions. The latest major stable revision of Perl 5 is 5.18, released in May 2013. Perl 6, which began as a redesign of Perl 5 in 2000, eventually evolved into a separate language. Both languages continue to be developed independently by different development teams and liberally borrow ideas from one another.

The Perl languages borrow features from other programming languages including C, shell scripting (sh), AWK, and sed.[8] They provide powerful text processing facilities without the arbitrary data-length limits of many contemporary Unix tools,[9] facilitating easy manipulation of text files. Perl 5 gained widespread popularity in the late 1990s as a CGI scripting language, in part due to its parsing abilities.[10]

In addition to CGI, Perl 5 is used for graphics programming, system administration, network programming, finance, bioinformatics, and other applications. It’s nicknamed “the Swiss Army chainsaw of scripting languages” because of its flexibility and power,[11] and possibly also because of its perceived “ugliness”.[12] In 1998, it was also referred to as the “duct tape that holds the Internet together”, in reference to its ubiquity and perceived inelegance.[13]

Perl was originally named “Pearl”. Wall wanted to give the language a short name with positive connotations; he claims that he considered (and rejected) every three- and four-letter word in the dictionary. He also considered naming it after his wife Gloria. Wall discovered the existing PEARL programming language before Perl’s official release and changed the spelling of the name.[36]

When referring to the language, the name is normally capitalized (Perl) as a proper noun. When referring to the interpreter program itself, the name is often uncapitalized (perl) because most Unix-like file systems are case-sensitive. Before the release of the first edition of Programming Perl, it was common to refer to the language as perl; Randal L. Schwartz, however, capitalized the language’s name in the book to make it stand out better when typeset. This case distinction was subsequently documented as canonical.[37]

There is some contention about the all-caps spelling “PERL”, which the documentation declares incorrect[37] and which some core community members consider a sign of outsiders.[38] The name is occasionally expanded as Practical Extraction and Report Language, but this is a backronym.[39] Other expansions have been suggested as equally canonical, including Wall’s own humorous Pathologically Eclectic Rubbish Lister.[40] Indeed, Wall claims that the name was intended to inspire many different expansions.[41]

The Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (CPAN) currently has 121,260 Perl modules in 27,769 distributions, written by 10,733 authors, mirrored on 270 servers.

The archive has been online since October 1995 and is constantly growing.

CPAN, the Comprehensive Perl Archive Network, is an archive of over 114,000 modules of software written in the Perl programming language, as well as documentation for them.[1] It has a presence on the World Wide Web at www.cpan.org and is mirrored worldwide at more than 200 locations.[2] CPAN can denote either the archive network itself, or the Perl program that acts as an interface to the network and as an automated software installer (somewhat like a package manager). Most software on CPAN is free and open source software.[3] CPAN was conceived in 1993, and the first web-accessible mirror was launched in January 1997.[4]

Like many programming languages, Perl has mechanisms to use external libraries of code, making one file contain common routines used by several programs. Perl calls these modules. Perl modules are typically installed in one of several directories whose paths are placed in the Perl interpreter when it is first compiled; on Unix-like operating systems, common paths include /usr/lib/perl5, /usr/local/lib/perl5, and several of their subdirectories.

Perl comes with a small set of core modules. Some of these perform bootstrapping tasks, such as ExtUtils::MakeMaker, which is used for building and installing other extension modules; others, like CGI.pm, are merely commonly used. The authors of Perl do not expect this limited group to meet every need, however.

The CPAN’s main purpose is to help programmers locate modules and programs not included in the Perl standard distribution. Its structure is decentralized. Authors maintain and improve their own modules. Forking, and creating competing modules for the same task or purpose is common. There is no formal bug tracking system, but there is a third-party bug tracking system that CPAN designated as the suggested official method of reporting issues with modules. Continuous development on modules is rare; many are abandoned by their authors, or go years between new versions being released. Sometimes a maintainer will be appointed to an abandoned module. They can release new versions of the module, and accept patches from the community to the module as their time permits. CPAN has no revision control system, although the source for the modules is often stored on GitHub. Also, the complete history of the CPAN and all its modules is available as the GitPAN project, allowing to easily see the complete history for all the modules and for easy maintenance of forks. CPAN is also used to distribute new versions of Perl, as well as related projects, such as Parrot.

The CPAN is an important resource for the professional Perl programmer. With over 23,000 modules (containing 20,000,000 lines of code) as of July 2011, the CPAN can save programmers weeks of time, and large Perl programs often make use of dozens of modules. Some of them, such as the DBI family of modules used for interfacing with SQL databases, are nearly irreplaceable in their area of function; others, such as the List::Util module, are simply handy resources containing a few common functions.

Files on the CPAN are referred to as distributions. A distribution may consist of one or more modules, documentation files, or programs packaged in a common archiving format, such as a gzipped tar archive or a ZIP file. Distributions will often contain installation scripts (usually called Makefile.PL or Build.PL) and test scripts which can be run to verify the contents of the distribution are functioning properly. New distributions are uploaded to the Perl Authors Upload Server, or PAUSE (see the section Uploading distributions with PAUSE).

In 2003, distributions started to include metadata files, called META.yml, indicating the distribution’s name, version, dependencies, and other useful information; however, not all distributions contain metadata. When metadata is not present in a distribution, the PAUSE’s software will usually try to analyze the code in the distribution to look for the same information; this is not necessarily very reliable.

With thousands of distributions, CPAN needs to be structured to be useful. Distributions on the CPAN are divided into 24 broad chapters based on their purpose, such as Internationalization and Locale; Archiving, Compression, And Conversion; and Mail and Usenet News. Distributions can also be browsed by author. Finally, the natural hierarchy of Perl module names (such as “Apache::DBI” or “Lingua::EN::Inflect”) can sometimes be used to browse modules in the CPAN.

CPAN module distributions usually have names in the form of CGI-Application-3.1 (where the :: used in the module’s name has been replaced with a dash, and the version number has been appended to the name), but this is only a convention; many prominent distributions break the convention, especially those that contain multiple modules. Security restrictions prevent a distribution from ever being replaced, so virtually all distribution names do include a version number.

There is also a Perl core module named CPAN; it is usually differentiated from the repository itself by using the name CPAN.pm. CPAN.pm is mainly an interactive shell which can be used to search for, download, and install distributions. An interactive shell called cpan is also provided in the Perl core, and is the usual way of running CPAN.pm. After a short configuration process and mirror selection, it uses tools available on the user’s computer to automatically download, unpack, compile, test, and install modules. It is also capable of updating itself.

More recently, an effort to replace CPAN.pm with something cleaner and more modern has resulted in the CPANPLUS (or CPAN++) set of modules. CPANPLUS separates the back-end work of downloading, compiling, and installing modules from the interactive shell used to issue commands. It also supports several advanced features, such as cryptographic signature checking and test result reporting. Finally, CPANPLUS can uninstall a distribution. CPANPLUS was added to the Perl core in version 5.10.0.

Both modules can check a distribution’s dependencies and can be set to recursively install any prerequisites, either automatically or with individual user approval. Both support FTP and HTTP and can work through firewalls and proxies.

Install all dependent packages for CPAN

sudo apt-get install build-essential

Invoke the cpan command as a normal user

cpan

Once you hit on enter for “cpan” to execute, you be asked of some few questions. To make it simple for yourself, answer “no” for the first question so that the latter ones will be done for you automatically.

Enter the commands below

make install
install Bundle::CPAN

Now all is set and you can install any perl module you want.

Type o conf init to reconfigure cpan.

The Best Perl Programmers Use Modern Perl

by chromatic

In 1987, Perl 1.0 changed the world. In the decades since then, the language has grown from a simple tool for system administration somewhere between shell scripting and C programming to a powerful, general purpose language steeped in a rich heritage.

Even so, most Perl 5 programs in the world take far too little advantage of the language. You can write Perl 5 programs as if they were Perl 4 programs (or Perl 3 or 2 or 1), but programs written to take advantage of everything amazing the worldwide Perl 5 community has invented, polished, and discovered are shorter, faster, more powerful, and easier to maintain than their alternatives.

They solve difficult problems with speed and elegance. They take advantage of the CPAN and its unparalleled library of reusable code. They get things done.

This productivity can be yours, whether you’ve dabbled with Perl for a decade or someone just handed you this book and said “Fix this code by Friday.”

Modern Perl is suitable for programmers of every level. It’s more than a Perl tutorial—only Modern Perl focuses on Perl 5.12 and 5.14, to demonstrate the latest and most effective time-saving features. Only Modern Perl explains how and why the language works, to let you unlock the full power of Perl.

Hone your skills. Sharpen your knowledge of the tools and techniques that make Perl so effective. Master everything Perl has to offer.

When you have to solve a problem now, reach for Perl. When you have to solve a problem right, reach for Modern Perl.

Visit the companion website at Modern Perl Books or read Modern Perl: the Book online.

Modern Perl installations include two clients to connect to, search, download, build, test, and install CPAN distributions, CPAN.pm and CPANPLUS. For the most part, each of these clients is equivalent for basic installation. This book recommends the use of CPAN.pm solely due to its ubiquity. With a recent version (as of this writing, 1.9800 is the latest stable release), module installation is reasonably easy. Start the client with:

    $ cpan

To install a distribution within the client:

    $ cpan
    cpan[1]> install Modern::Perl

… or to install directly from the command line:

    $ cpan Modern::Perl

Eric Wilhelm’s tutorial on configuring CPAN.pm http://learnperl.scratchcomputing.com/tutorials/configuration/ includes a great troubleshooting section.

The Eric Python IDE

Eric is a full featured Python and Ruby editor and IDE, written in python. It is based on the cross platform Qt gui toolkit, integrating the highly flexible Scintilla editor control. It is designed to be usable as everdays’ quick and dirty editor as well as being usable as a professional project management tool integrating […]

Eric is a full featured Python and Ruby editor and IDE, written in python. It is based on the cross platform Qt gui toolkit, integrating the highly flexible Scintilla editor control. It is designed to be usable as everdays’ quick and dirty editor as well as being usable as a professional project management tool integrating many advanced features Python offers the professional coder. eric4 includes a plugin system, which allows easy extension of the IDE functionality with plugins downloadable from the net.

Current stable versions are eric4 based on Qt4 and Python 2 and eric5 based on Python 3 and Qt4.


http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1601218

sudo apt-get install libqt4-dev
install python3.2-dev (sudo apt-get install python3.2-dev)
Use Synaptic or Download it from here: http://www.riverbankcomputing.co.uk
1) build/install qscintilla
2) build/install sip
3) build/install PyQt
Python 3.2.3
Qt 4.8.1
PyQt 4.9.1
QScintilla 2.6.1


Python from Scratch

Android SDK

Android software development is the process by which new applications are created for the Android operating system. Applications are usually developed in the Java programming language using the Android Software Development Kit, but other development tools are available. As of October 2012[update], more than 700,000 applications have been developed for Android, with over 25 billion […]

Android software development is the process by which new applications are created for the Android operating system. Applications are usually developed in the Java programming language using the Android Software Development Kit, but other development tools are available. As of October 2012[update], more than 700,000 applications have been developed for Android, with over 25 billion downloads.[2][3] A June 2011 research indicated that over 67% of mobile developers used the platform, at the time of publication.[4] In Q2 2012; around 105 million units of Android smartphones were shipped which acquires a total share of 68% in overall smartphones sale till Q2 2012.[5]

The ADT Bundle provides everything you need to start developing apps, including a version of the Eclipse IDE with built-in ADT (Android Developer Tools) to streamline your Android app development. If you haven’t already, go download the Android ADT Bundle. (If you downloaded the SDK Tools only, for use with an existing IDE, you should instead read Setting Up an Existing IDE.)

Install the SDK and Eclipse IDE

  1. Unpack the ZIP file (named adt-bundle-<os_platform>.zip) and save it to an appropriate location, such as a “Development” directory in your home directory.
  2. Open the adt-bundle-<os_platform>/eclipse/ directory and launch eclipse.

That’s it! The IDE is already loaded with the Android Developer Tools plugin and the SDK is ready to go. To start developing, read Building Your First App.

Caution: Do not move any of the files or directories from the adt-bundle-<os_platform> directory. If you move the eclipse or sdk directory, ADT will not be able to locate the SDK and you’ll need to manually update the ADT preferences.

Additional information

As you continue developing apps, you may need to install additional versions of Android for the emulator and other packages such as the library for Google Play In-app Billing. To install more packages, use the SDK Manager.

Everything you need to develop Android apps is on this web site, including design guidelines, developer training, API reference, and information about how you can distribute your app. For additional resources about developing and distributing your app, see the Developer Support Resources.

There is a community of open-source enthusiasts that build and share Android-based firmware with a number of customizations and additional features, such as FLAC lossless audio support and the ability to store downloaded applications on the microSD card.[42] This usually involves rooting the device. Rooting allows users root access to the operating system, enabling full control of the phone. In order to use custom firmwares the device’s bootloader must be unlocked. Rooting alone does not allow the flashing of custom firmware. Modified firmwares allow users of older phones to use applications available only on newer releases.[43]

Those firmware packages are updated frequently, incorporate elements of Android functionality that haven’t yet been officially released within a carrier-sanctioned firmware, and tend to have fewer limitations. CyanogenMod and OMFGB are examples of such firmware.

On 24 September 2009, Google issued a cease and desist letter[44] to the modder Cyanogen, citing issues with the re-distribution of Google’s closed-source applications[45] within the custom firmware. Even though most of Android OS is open source, phones come packaged with closed-source Google applications for functionality such as the Android Market and GPS navigation. Google has asserted that these applications can only be provided through approved distribution channels by licensed distributors. Cyanogen has complied with Google’s wishes and is continuing to distribute this mod without the proprietary software. He has provided a method to back up licensed Google applications during the mod’s install process and restore them when it is complete.[46]

The NDK is a toolset that allows you to implement parts of your app using native-code languages such as C and C++. For certain types of apps, this can be helpful so you can reuse existing code libraries written in these languages, but most apps do not need the Android NDK.

Before downloading the NDK, you should understand that the NDK will not benefit most apps. As a developer, you need to balance its benefits against its drawbacks. Notably, using native code on Android generally does not result in a noticable performance improvement, but it always increases your app complexity. In general, you should only use the NDK if it is essential to your app—never because you simply prefer to program in C/C++.

Typical good candidates for the NDK are self-contained, CPU-intensive operations that don’t allocate much memory, such as signal processing, physics simulation, and so on. When examining whether or not you should develop in native code, think about your requirements and see if the Android framework APIs provide the functionality that you need.


MobileGo is a life saver for those who love music and video, text a lot and juggle apps on their Android phones and tablets.

Android Fans:Backup everything to PC with 1 click & retain 100% quality.
Music Lovers:Instantly add fun stuff and enjoy media anytime, anywhere.
App Addicts:Download, install, uninstall and export apps quickly and easily.
Socialites:Transfer contacts from/to Outlook and send & reply SMS seamlessly from your PC.
The Android 3.1 platform (also backported to Android 2.3.4) introduces Android Open Accessory support, which allows external USB hardware (an Android USB accessory) to interact with an Android-powered device in a special “accessory” mode. When an Android-powered device is in accessory mode, the connected accessory acts as the USB host (powers the bus and enumerates devices) and the Android-powered device acts as the USB device. Android USB accessories are specifically designed to attach to Android-powered devices and adhere to a simple protocol (Android accessory protocol) that allows them to detect Android-powered devices that support accessory mode.[22]

Control de versión

Los repositorios administrados de documentos son importantes en el trabajo en equipo cuando varios miembros deben trabajar de manera simultánea o coordinada sobre los mismos documentos, pero también es útil en el caso de lobos solitarios. Control de versión es el arte de administrar cambios. Es una herramienta crítica en el desarrollo de software. Algunos […]

Los repositorios administrados de documentos son importantes en el trabajo en equipo cuando varios miembros deben trabajar de manera simultánea o coordinada sobre los mismos documentos, pero también es útil en el caso de lobos solitarios. Control de versión es el arte de administrar cambios. Es una herramienta crítica en el desarrollo de software.

Algunos sistemas de control de versión son administradores de software (Software Configuration Management). Estos sistemas están especí­ficamente diseñados para administrar árboles de código fuente y soportan el ciclo de vida de aplicaciones. Otros sistemas son repositorios generales de documentos.

Un repositorio de información para control de versión guarda un registro de los cambios hechos tanto a los datos como a la estructura misma de archivos. Un cliente puede no solo ver la última versión de los documentos guardados, sino también estados previos del sistema de archivos. Por ejemplo un cliente puede hacer consultas del tipo ¿Qué cambios se hicieron en un documento en la última semana?

El problema fundamental es por un lado ¿Cómo compartir información y coordinar modificaciones concurrentes a un grupo de documentos? Y complementariamente ¿Cómo recuperar estados anteriores de los documentos cuando una serie de cambios resultan inapropiados o se requieren variaciones de base común?

Un enfoque para evitar conflictos es reservar-modificar-cambiar (lock-modify-unlock). Este enfoque no siempre garantiza la integridad o coherencia de un sistema cuando se trabaja con múltiples documentos y serializa el trabajo innecesariamente cuando se pudiera hacer cambios independientes. Otro enfoque es copiar-modificar-integrar (copy-modify-merge). El repositorio puede asistir en el manejo de documentos y sus cambios, pero una persona necesita hacer el análisis de si un conjunto de cambios es valido y los miembros de un equipo deben mantener una buena comunicación.

En el caso particular del software algunas de las áreas que soporta un SCM son:

    • Administración de versiones múltiples, permitiendo a usuarios y desarrolladores reportas defectos y cambios con relación a versiones históricas.
    • Administración de equipos de desarrollo, permitiendo que varios programadores trabajen en un mismo archivo e integrando los cambios.
    • Auditorias de cambios.

Los sistemas de control de versión trabajan con dos elementos base: áreas de trabajo y repositorios. Las áreas de trabajo es donde se hacen cambios y el repositorio es el lugar donde se guardan los documentos de referencia que sincronizan el trabajo de todos y define el estado de la información. El repositorio guarda metadata que permite rastrear cambios y versiones.
El paradigma central de control de versión es Pedir/Aplicar (check out/commit). Todos los documentos se almacenan en el repositorio. El programador registra una copia en su área de trabajo y procede a aplicar cambios a su copia. Cuando los cambios son estables, se aplican al repositorio de acuerdo a polí­ticas de administración de cambios y resolución de conflictos.

Dos conceptos importantes en la administración de cambios son ramas (branches) y etiquetas (tags). La ramificación del código permite mantener el desarrollo del sistema y liberar versiones de acuerdo a plataformas, características y pruebas; O para pruebas de código experimental. Etiquetas son similares a ramas pero puntos de referencia en la misma línea de desarrollo, no a una variante del mismo.

El abuelito y punto de referencia de los sistemas de control de versión es CVS, referenciado a scripts escritos por Dick Grune y publicados en comp.sources.unix en diciembre de 1986.

Sistemas de control de versión:
CVS
Subversion
Perforce (p4)
BitKeeper
VOODOO Server
ClearCase
RCS (Revision Control System)

Herramientas gratuitas para UML

Existen herramientas gratuitas de buena caliadad para UML. Tanto Netbeans como Eclipse soportan esta funcionalidad con el ciclo completo de desarrollo desde generación de código hasta reingenieria. Esto, claro, si se quiere trabajar en Java. En .Net no he encontrado este grado de funcionalidad en herramientas Open Source. Una opción de bajo costo, relativo a […]

Existen herramientas gratuitas de buena caliadad para UML. Tanto Netbeans como Eclipse soportan esta funcionalidad con el ciclo completo de desarrollo desde generación de código hasta reingenieria. Esto, claro, si se quiere trabajar en Java. En .Net no he encontrado este grado de funcionalidad en herramientas Open Source. Una opción de bajo costo, relativo a RUP y similares, es Visual UML. Visual Paradigm tiene una edición limitada sin costo, Smart Development Environment Community Edition for Visual Studio.

UML, ejemplo sencillo sobre Modelado de un Proyecto Introducción a UML

Eclipse, herramienta universal – IDE abierto y extensible

Eclipse: una herramienta profesional al alcance de todos Pese a que Eclipse está escrito en su mayor parte en Java (salvo el núcleo) y que su uso más popular sea como un IDE para Java, Eclipse es neutral y adaptable a cualquier tipo de lenguaje, por ejemplo C/C++, Cobol, C#, XML, etc. La característica clave […]

Eclipse: una herramienta profesional al alcance de todos Pese a que Eclipse está escrito en su mayor parte en Java (salvo el núcleo) y que su uso más popular sea como un IDE para Java, Eclipse es neutral y adaptable a cualquier tipo de lenguaje, por ejemplo C/C++, Cobol, C#, XML, etc. La característica clave de Eclipse es la extensibilidad. Eclipse es una gran estructura formada por un núcleo y muchos plug-ins que van conformando la funcionalidad final. La forma en que los plug-ins interactúan es mediante interfaces o puntos de extensión; así, las nuevas aportaciones se integran sin dificultad ni conflictos.

Eclipse fue producto de una inversión de cuarenta millones de dólares de IBM en su desarrollo antes de ofrecerlo como un producto de código abierto al consorcio Eclipse.org que estaba compuesto inicialmente por Borland e IBM. IBM sigue dirigiendo el desarrollo de Eclipse a través de su subsidiaria OTI (Object Technologies International), creadora de Eclipse. OTI fue adquirida por IBM en 1996 y se consolidó como gran empresa de desarrollo de herramientas orientadas a objeto (O.O.) desde la popularidad del lenguaje Smalltalk. OTI era la división de IBM en la que se generaron los productos Visual Age, que marcaron el estándar de las herramientas de desarrollo Orientado a objetos. Muchos conceptos pioneros en Smalltalk fueron aplicados en Java, creando Visual Age for Java (VA4J). VA4J fue escrito en Smalltalk. Eclipse es una reescritura de VA4J en Java. La base para Eclipse es la Plataforma de cliente enriquecido (del Inglés Rich Client Platform RCP). Los siguientes componentes constituyen la plataforma de cliente enriquecido:

Plataforma principal – inicio de Eclipse, ejecución de plugins OSGi – una plataforma para integrar distribuciones. El Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT) – Un widget toolkit portable. JFace – manejo de archivos, manejo de texto, editores de texto El Workbench de Eclipse – vistas, editores, perspectivas, asistentes

Los widgets de Eclipse están implementados por un herramienta de widget para Java llamada SWT, a diferencia de la mayoría de las aplicaciones Java, que usan las opciones estándar Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) o Swing. La interfaz de usuario de Eclipse también tiene una capa GUI intermedia llamada JFace, la cual simplifica la construcción de aplicaciones basada en SWT. El entorno integrado de desarrollo (IDE) de Eclipse emplea módulos (plug-in) para proporcionar toda su funcionalidad al frente de la plataforma de cliente rico, a diferencia de otros entornos monolí­ticos donde las funcionalidades están todas incluidas, las necesite el usuario o no. Este mecanismo de módulos es una plataforma ligera para componentes de software. Se provee soporte para Java y CVS en el SDK de Eclipse. En cuanto a las aplicaciones clientes, eclipse provee al programador con frameworks muy ricos para el desarrollo de aplicaciones gráficas, definición y manipulación de modelos de software, aplicaciones web, etc. Por ejemplo, GEF (Graphic Editing Framework – Framework para la edición gráfica) es un plugin de eclipse para el desarrollo de editores visuales que pueden ir desde procesadores de texto wysiwyg hasta editores de diagramas UML, interfaces gráficas para el usuario (GUI), etc. El SDK de Eclipse incluye las herramientas de desarrollo de Java, ofreciendo un IDE con un compilador de Java interno y un modelo completo de los archivos fuente de Java. Esto permite técnicas avanzadas de refactorización y análisis de código. El IDE también hace uso de un espacio de trabajo, en este caso un grupo de metadata en un espacio para archivos plano, permitiendo modificaciones externas a los archivos en tanto se refresque el espacio de trabajo correspondiente. Núcleo: su tarea es determinar cuales son los plug-ins disponibles en el directorio de plug-ins de Eclipse. Cada plug-in tiene un fichero XML manifest que lista los elementos que necesita de otros plug-ins así­ como los puntos de extensión que ofrece. Como la cantidad de plug-ins puede ser muy grande, solo se cargan los necesarios en el momento de ser utilizados con el objeto de minimizar el tiempo de arranque de Eclipse y recursos. Entorno de trabajo: maneja los recursos del usuario, organizados en uno o más proyectos. Cada proyecto corresponde a un directorio en el directorio de trabajo de Eclipse, y contienen archivos y carpetas. Interfaz de usuario: muestra los menús y herramientas, y se organiza en perspectivas que configuran los editores de código y las vistas. A diferencia de muchas aplicaciones escritas en Java, Eclipse tiene el aspecto y se comporta como una aplicación nativa. Esta programada SWT (Standard Widget Toolkit) y Jface (juego de herramientas construida sobre SWT), que emula los gráficos nativos de cada sistema operativo. Este ha sido un aspecto discutido sobre Eclipse, porque SWT debe ser portada a cada sistema operativo para interactuar con el sistema gráfico. En los proyectos de Java puede usarse AWT y Swing salvo cuando se desarrolle un plug-in para Eclipse. Para descargar Eclipse existen distribuciones con diferentes combinaciones de plug-ins dependiendo del uso que se le quiera dar a la herramienta. Un problema que se presenta con estas distribuciones es que en Windows XP el descompresor integrado a veces falla y es preferible usar un programa externo como 7-zip, WinZIP, o info-zip

subversion

¿Qué es Subversion? Subversion es un sistema de control de versiones libre y de código fuente abierto. Es decir, Subversion maneja ficheros y directorios a través del tiempo. Hay un Árbol de archivos en un repositorio central. El repositorio es como un servidor de archivos ordinario, excepto que recuerda todos los cambios hechos a sus […]

¿Qué es Subversion?

Subversion es un sistema de control de versiones libre y de código fuente abierto. Es decir, Subversion maneja ficheros y directorios a través del tiempo. Hay un Árbol de archivos en un repositorio central. El repositorio es como un servidor de archivos ordinario, excepto que recuerda todos los cambios hechos a sus archivos y directorios. Esto permite recuperar versiones antiguas de datos o examinar el historial de cambios de los mismos. En este aspecto, mucha gente piensa en los sistemas de versiones como en una especie de máquina del tiempo.

Subversion proporciona:

Versionado de directorios
CVS solamente lleva el historial de archivos individuales, pero Subversion implementa un sistema de archivos versionado virtual que sigue los cambios sobre árboles de directorios completos a través del tiempo. Ambos, archivos y directorios, se encuentran bajo el control de versiones.
Verdadero historial de versiones
CVS está limitado al versionado de archivos. Operaciones como copiar y renombrar, las cuales pueden ocurrir sobre archivos, pero realmente son cambios al contenido del directorio en el que se encuentran, no son soportadas por CVS. Adicionalmente, en CVS no puede reemplazar un archivo versionado con algo nuevo que lleve el mismo nombre sin que el nuevo elemento herede el historial del archivo antiguo que quizás sea completamente distinto al anterior. Con Subversion, se puede añadir, borrar, copiar, y renombrar archivos y directorios. Cada fichero nuevo añadido comienza con un historial nuevo, limpio y completamente suyo.
Envíos atómicos
Una colección cualquiera de modificaciones o bien entra por completo al repositorio, o bien no lo hace en absoluto. Ésto permite a los desarrolladores construir y enviar los cambios como fragmentos lógicos e impide que ocurran problemas cuando sólo una parte de los cambios enviados lo hace con éxito.
Versionado de metadatos
Cada archivo o directorio tiene un conjunto de propiedades claves y sus valores asociado. Se puede crear y almacenar cualquier par arbitrario de clave/valor. Las propiedades son versionadas a través del tiempo, al igual que el contenido de los ficheros.
Elección de las capas de red
Subversion tiene una noción abstracta del acceso al repositorio, facilitando a las personas implementar nuevos mecanismos de red. Subversion puede conectarse al servidor HTTP Apache como un módulo de extensión. Ésto proporciona a Subversion una gran ventaja en estabilidad e interoperabilidad, y acceso instantáneo a las caracterí­sticas existentes que ofrece este servidor: autenticación, autorización, compresión de la conexión, etcétera. También tiene disponible un servidor de Subversion independiente, y más ligero. Este servidor habla un protocolo propio, el cual puede ser encaminado fácilmente a través de un túnel SSH.
La versión de default trabaja con apache 2.0 pero es posible bajar un versión para apache 2.2.4
Manipulación consistente de datos
Subversion expresa las diferencias del archivo usando un algoritmo de diferenciación binario, que funciona idénticamente con ficheros de texto (legibles para humanos) y ficheros binarios (ilegibles para humanos). Ambos tipos de ficheros son almacenados igualmente comprimidos en el repositorio, y las diferencias son transmitidas en ambas direcciones a través de la red.
Ramificación y etiquetado eficientes
El coste de ramificación y etiquetado no necesita ser proporcional al tamaño del proyecto. Subversion crea ramas y etiquetas simplemente copiando el proyecto, usando un mecanismo similar al enlace duro. De este modo estas operaciones toman solamente una cantidad de tiempo pequeña y constante.

Subversion almacena todos los datos versionados en un repositorio central. TortoiseSvn is un proyecto hermano que proporciona integración con Windows explorer. Vea Capítulo 6, Configuración del servidor para aprender acerca de los diferentes tipos de procesos servidor disponibles y cómo configurarlos. svnserver puede correr como un servicio de Windows. Para crear el servicio http://svn.haxx.se/dev/archive-2006-11/0348.shtmlhttp://httpd.apache.org/download.cgi

http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.0/ch06s03.html

http://svn.collab.net/repos/svn/trunk/notes/windows-service.txt